IBMR Online

Recent Articles & ReviewsREAD IBMR ONLINESUBSCRIBER HELP

  • books pic

    New Centers of Global Evangelicalism in Latin America and Africa

    J. Kwabena Asamoah-Gyadu

    book cover

    [Book Review] This book highlights the clear development of the areas mentioned (alongside Asia) as the new heartlands of Christianity. The evolution of Christianity as a non-Western religion is tilted toward conservative, rather than liberal, evangelicalism. As the new centers of evangelicalism, Latin America and Africa, Offutt notes, have become “socioeconomically diverse, better connected internationally, and increasingly socially engaged”. In unpacking this observation, Offutt draws attention to aspects of the development of the new Christianity that help us appreciate the wider significance of what has been going on with the faith in the Global South, beyond its religiotheological impact. (April 2016)

    READ MORE

  • author pic

    Postwar American Evangelicals and World Religions: A Case Study of Intervarsity’s Urbana Student Missionary Conventions

    Amber R. Thomas

    poster

    This paper traces the major discussions of “world” or “non-Christian” religions in the speeches, promotion, and scholarly texts related to InterVarsity Christian Fellowship’s triennial “Urbana” Student Missionary Convention and argues that Urbana sources enlarge the understanding of postwar American evangelicals’ concerns about non-Christian religions by showing that evangelicals assessed the religions’ implications for global evangelization as secondary to those of other geopolitical developments, chiefly Communism, postcolonial nationalism, and internationalism. Photo at right: The first logo featured a compass centered upon a globe. © 1948 InterVarsity Christian Fellowship. (July 2016)

    READ MORE

  • author pic

    The Legacy of Luella Miner

    Mary Shepard Wong

    group pic

    Luella Miner

    Luella Miner, missionary to China from 1887 to 1935, was the founder and president of the first college for women in China. Her many writings, including letters, journals, articles, and books, are a window into China's changing political scene in the early twentieth century and into the life of an educational missionary in north China who helped launch basic education for girls and higher education for women. Photo at right: used with permission of the Archives of the United Board for Christian Higher Education in Asia, Special Collections, Yale Divinity School Library.
    (July 2016)

    READ MORE

  • author pic

    My Pilgrimage in Mission

    Robin Boyd

    group pic

    Born in Belfast, Robin Boyd served the Student Christian Movement and in 1954 went to India (Gujarat), becoming a presbyter of the nascent (1970) Church of North India. In 1974 he moved to Australia, and ministered in a parish of the Uniting Church. Later he was director of the Irish School of Ecumenics (Dublin). Photo at right: Silvanus Christian (center), Church of North India’s Bishop of Gujarat, met with Robin Boyd, his wife Anne Booth-Clibborn, and others at the Edinburgh grave of Joseph Van Someren Taylor, known as “Father of Gujarati Grammar.” (July 2016)

    READ MORE

  • author pic

    Marketing Mission: The Divergence in Missiological Thought between Pastors and Missionary Leadership

    Charity Reeb, Charles Hermans, & Christina Simmers

    chart pic

    This qualitative study examines paradigms of the definition of mission as held by high-level Assembly of God pastors and missionary leaders. The study reveals that the two groups differ in their definition of mission. In the church, pastors generally feel that "mission" encompasses outreach to all people groups; missionaries, however, consider that mission is specific to the apostolic function, namely, reaching out with the Gospel where no one has gone before—to unreached people groups (UPGs). Implications for missionary leadership suggest a targeted marketing approach; using niche strategies directed to the mission-funding churches may be needed. (July 2016)

    READ MORE

  • author pic

    Music, Peacebuilding, and Interfaith Dialogue: Transformative Bridges in Muslim–Christian Relations

    Roberta R. King

    Byzantine Monks and the Al-Kindi Sufi Ensemble of Damascus

    Byzantine Monks and the Al-Kindi Sufi Ensemble of Damascus

    An ever-increasing need to find creative approaches and mission models to engage with Muslim neighbors exists. Studies have shown that musical performance can evoke transformative moments that enhance communication and restore broken relationships. In this article, I explore the intersection of music, peacebuilding, and interfaith dialogue in light of Muslim-Christian relations. I ask how music contributes to peacebuilding among peoples of differing faiths by investigating the roles music plays in promoting peace and living with the other. (July 2016)

    READ MORE

  • author pic

    The Gospel and Art

    Darrell Whiteman, Interim Editor

    Jesus and Zacchaeus pic

    “Jesus and Zacchaeus”
    by Soichi Watanabe

    As a universal faith, Christianity is not threatened by diversity. In fact, it welcomes and celebrates diversity, as we can see in John’s vision on Patmos: “After this I looked, and there was an enormous crowd—no one could count all the people! They were from every race, tribe, nation, and language” (Rev. 7:9 GNB). Given this ethnic and linguistic diversity, we can easily see how the Christian faith is capable of holding in creative tension a variety of biblical interpretations, worship patterns, institutional structures, and cognitive, affective, and aesthetic expressions of our faith. (April 2016)

    READ MORE

  • author pic

    "Apostle of Ethnology": Missiological Anthropology Between the World Wars

    Benjamin L. Hartley

    Agnes C. L. Donohugh pic

    Agnes C. L. Donohugh

    Agnes C. L. Donohugh (1876–1966) taught at Hartford Theological Seminary's Kennedy School of Missions between 1918 and 1944, the leading graduate program in mission studies in North America prior to World War II. The first missionary student of Franz Boas at Columbia University, Donohugh influenced the shape of graduate anthropological education for missionaries in America more than anyone else in the interwar period. Donohugh's story provides a window into understanding how anthropology was first used in mission education in America. (April 2016)

    READ MORE

  • author pic

    The 1925 Vatican Mission Exposition and the Interface Between Catholic Mission Theory and World Religions

    Angelyn Dries

    Wilhelm Schmidt pic

    Wilhelm Schmidt, SVD

    In 2014, Latin America passed Europe as the continent with the most Christians. In 1900, Europe had six times as many Christians as Latin America. Looking ahead to 2025, however, Latin America is likely to be surpassed by Africa with 628 million in the former and more than 700 million in the latter. We also project that by 2050, Asia will surpass Europe in the number of Christians. Each of the three continents in the Global South could outnumber Europe, together representing nearly 80% of all Christians (from just over 20% in 1900). (April 2016)

    READ MORE

  • author pic

    The Christian Art Scene in Yogyakarta, Indonesia

    Volker Küster

    Nativity pic

    Sasongko, “Nativity”

    The Christian artists introduced here from Yogyakarta, Indonesia; all have at least some academic background, and most are converted Muslims. In different degrees, their work attempts to contextualize Christian faith in the cultural-religious pluralism of present-day Indonesia. In doing so, they contribute to the development of Indonesian theology. (April 2016)

    READ MORE

  • author pic

    Christian Art in China during the Period of Economic Reform

    Jeremy Clarke

    Our Lady of Victories pic

    Our Lady of Victories

    The Chinese Catholic Church has a rich tradition of producing art that depicts its faith. During its more than 400 years of continuous history, not counting earlier incarnations, these works have also incorporated inculturated motifs, such as figures drawn from Buddhist iconography and the use of fauna and flora. Since the period of economic reform in China began, the Catholic communities have had greater freedom than in earlier decades, which had led to the production of many new images. The inculturated forms, however, have not always been so well received. (April 2016)

    READ MORE

  • author pic

    Christian Art in India: Early Christianity from the Arrival of the Portuguese Until Today

    Gudrun Löwner

    Christ among the Refugees pic

    P. Solomon Raj, “Christ among the Refugees”

    From the seventh century to the present, Christian art has existed in India. Astonishing is the fact that some of the best artistic pieces were done not by Christians, but by Hindus, Muslims, etc. This is especially visible in the Mogul miniatures of the Mogul court of Akbar to the Bengali art of the 20th century, where artists identified in Jesus the suffering Indian humanity. Today a lot of Christian art is engaging with the struggles of the people at the margins. Besides this social critical art, modern art forms are emerging which shed their Indian identity and could be done anywhere in the world. (April 2016)

    READ MORE

  • author pic

    Missions from Korea 2016: Sustainability and Revitalization

    Steve Sang-Cheol Moon

    chart pic

    According the most recent survey directed by the author, there are 20,672 Korean missionaries working through 159 mission agencies in 171 countries. The number of missionaries grew by 205 persons in 2015 marking an annual growth rate of 1.01 percent. The annual growth rate dropped phenomenally from 2.19 percent in 2012, to 1.90 percent in 2014, and further down to 1.01 percent in 2015. The Korean missionary movement is entering an unfamiliar phase of development characterized by losing momentum for further growth. Most of the Korean missionaries are well aware of the current situation and share certain realistic views and outlooks. (April 2016)

    READ MORE

  • books pic

    Fifteen Outstanding Books of 2015 for Mission Studies

    Editors

    book cover

    The editors of the International Bulletin of Mission Research have selected fifteen books published in 2015 for special recognition of their contribution to mission studies. We commend the authors, editors, and publishers represented here for their contribution to the advancement of scholarship in studies of the Christian mission and world Christianity. (April 2016)

    READ MORE

  • books pic

    Understanding Insider Movements: Disciples of Jesus within Diverse Religious Communities

    Amos Yong

    book cover

    [Book Review] This is not an unbiased, neutral evaluation of insider movements (IMs); at the same time, it is also not an uncritical advocate for IMs that ignores questions that have been raised over the last fifteen plus years about such phenomena. In fact, scholars like Phil Parshall and Timothy Tennant, who have raised concerns, are among the most cited and engaged in the book, even as there is an extended response to the most sustained critique so far of IMs—Doug Coleman’s A Theological Analysis of the Insider Movement Paradigm from Four Perspectives (WCIU Press, 2011). (April 2016)

    READ MORE

  • books pic

    Jesus and Buddha: Friends in Conversation

    Terry C. Muck

    book cover

    [Book Review] What Paul Knitter and Roger Haight attempt to do (and so admirably succeed at doing) in this book has been done before. Putting two scholars in conversation about a topic, in this case Jesus and Buddha, has yielded good cognitive fruit. One of the best and most recent books like this one was Ulrich Luz’s and Axel Michaels’s Encountering Jesus and Buddha: Their Lives and Teachings (Fortress Press, 2006). The format allows for productive disagreement, even more productive consilience, and a chance for each conversation partner to be a witness for his or her approach to religious belief. (April 2016)

    READ MORE

  • books pic

    The Spirit of Praise: Music and Worship in Global Pentecostal-Charismatic Christianity

    Allan H. Anderson

    book cover

    [Book Review] Pentecostalism is well known for its innovative music and worship, but there has been little academic reflection on this central aspect of its life, which can be seen as a significant reason for its global growth. Pentecostalism is remarkably diverse, and the editors have excelled in assembling an interdisciplinary collection of articles from five continents. (Unfortunately, Asia is not represented, and nearly half of the chapters are focused on North America.) Social scientists, ethnomusicologists, and theologians have contributed to this significant volume. (April 2016)

    READ MORE

  • books pic

    Christians in South Indian Villages, 1959–2009: Decline and Revival in Telangana

    Chandra Mallampalli

    book cover

    [Book Review] This volume presents valuable insights concerning the trajectory of village Christian congregations in South India over the past fifty years. It balances ground-level data drawn from recent fieldwork with broader observations that mirror developments in world Christianity, particularly the shift from the prominence of mainline church congregations to that of independent churches with moorings in Pentecostalism. The book builds upon the 1968 work of P. Y. Luke and John B. Carman (Village Christians and Hindu Culture) concerning the village Christians of the Medak Diocese of South India. (April 2016)

    READ MORE


Noteworthy | READ ONLINE

Dissertation Notices | READ ONLINE

Search IBMR Articles | GO TO SEARCH

Subscriber Help | READ ONLINE

Previous Issues

April 2015

Hostility against Mission

July 2015

Mission in History

October 2015

Engaging Mission

January 2016

SAGE / OMSC

Some Changes but the Same missio Dei